Belle Jar Canning

for the passion of preserving food

Hot Sauce Man

8 Comments

Once in a while I need to share the kitchen. I see it as my domain, it’s kind of hard for me to stay away. When my husband cooks, I look over his shoulder and probably speak far too many words for his liking. But when it’s hot sauce time, I’m out. Just walking through the front door of our home my senses are flooded with spice, hot and vinegary, eyes watering, nostrils tingling.The look on his face as he cooks his fiery sauces down is enough to keep me from coming to close.

Glorious Hot Sauce!

His creations are truly fabulous, fruity, intense, with tamarind or fig or mango and peach, Whisky gets thrown in at times for an added kick of flavour, coriander, cumin, smoked paprika too. Our garden is bursting with Scotch Bonnet, Turks Cap, Cayenne, Pimento, Chiero Recife, Aji Limon, Lemon Drop, Concha Del Toro, Jalapeno. These peppers all have unique flavours, though I’m not brave enough to eat one on it’s own to find out! I will happily taste them in hot sauce.

A few of my husband's peppers

Are you wondering what possible use we have for this much variety in hot sauce? There are eggs to cover and meat to marinate, soups, stews, chili. From tacos to quinoa to mac-n-cheese, we find ways!

And there is always gift giving.

Basics of My Husband’s Hot Sauce

The first step is to cook up the non-hot pepper ingredients, such as onions, garlic, red bell peppers, and puree in a blender without hot peppers, fruit can be added here as well.  Cook hot peppers, saute or roast,  soft enough to puree, seeded or not, up to you. The more peppers, the hotter it will be, so seed some and leave some whole to your liking. Puree in the blender with a small amount of vinegar, unless you are using other liquid such as Whisky or fruit juice. Mix all the ingredients of your choice, base ingredient puree and hot pepper puree, together in a stock pot, thin with vinegar to desired consistency, then heat to 195*. Pour into sterilized jars (order 5 oz Woozies on line, I love that name..) cap and set them in a cool place to keep for 6 months to a year depending on ingredients and vinegar level (fruit won’t keep as long if the vinegar level is low).

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Author: Tamika

Creating Life

8 thoughts on “Hot Sauce Man

  1. Willing to share just one recipe? Pretty please?

  2. Make it up as you go along! You should have a million choices of hot peppers in San Fran, skip Jalapeno and other common ones. Use figs or peaches or mmm… Pomegranates should be getting ready up your way (my aunt says her guavas are ready there) Stick with what is local and in season (easy where you are, I’m always northern Cal dreaming). Add some vinegar to taste.. voila!

  3. I prefer a recipe since I am such a wimp when it comes to hot stuff! lol Not sure I would do to good at the ‘winging it’ part :)

  4. just curious how much vinegar you add per 5 oz bottle. i have also seen people add a dab of plain yogurt to get the good bacteria a head start, do you or your husband approve?

    • My husband adds vinegar to a whole batch, I would put the percentage around 35-40. I have never seen yoghurt added to hot sauce! I’ll look into it, but I think the vinegar kills all the bacteria. Fermented hot sauce may have a spot of yoghurt with no vinegar added.
      I’ll try to get a solid recipe out of him ;-)

  5. Great looking sauces. Tell your husband to come join us on http://www.thehotpepper.com/

  6. Beautiful! Wondering if you should be telling people that they need to have a ph of less than 4.6 in order to avoid botulism!~ :)

    • Hi,

      Thank you for that insight! If hot sauce is made with vinegar added, there is no worry of botulism what so ever. Botulism occurs in a low acid environment only (lower than 4.6). We actually make fermented hot sauce now, letting peppers ferment for a month or more, before adding vinegar. The bottling technique we use is the commercial method, USDA approved, (pour in hot product, screw on cap, invert bottles until cool).
      Enjoy your canning and bottling this season!

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